C X Silver Gallery

Nina Isabelle

Nina Isabelle is a process based artist working with language, perception, action and phenomena. Her approach frames the interlacement of multiple art modalities, including recursive photography, video motion-studies, fugue mark-making & notional painting, gesture abstractions & movement, along with task-based performative actions and object construction, as research tactics used to locate, decipher and authenticate lateral vantages, perceptions, and information as a way to reinspect and rescript narratives & notions.

Isabelle identifies with Maximalism and Action Art and works to push material and information past the point of recognition in a way that forces a shift in meaning as a way to reveal new information that can transform and challenge the limits of material, perception, approach and belief. Her approach aims to deconstruct sensory input to the extent that meanings becomes shifted and interpretation can become a phenomena of psychic imprint. Referencing the failure of dialogue, the dissonance between form and content, as well as the shortcomings of literal language & the superimposition of objects, Isabelle frames her process as both an inquiry and a demonstration of a recursive method that highjacks the results of prior work in order to cultivate future outcomes in a process akin to an AI robot discovering how to make sourdough bread out of itself.

Ceaselessly motivated to challenge the boundaries of perception and approach, Isabelle collaborates with new situations to compel viewership in unexpected directions. Her work has been exhibited internationally at The Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Gimpo, South Korea, The Unstitute in Catalunya, Spain, Studio Fidlär in Berlin, The Bangkok Underground Film Festival in Thailand, NA Gallery in South Korea as well as nationally at Roman Susan in Chicago, IL, The San Diego Art Institute, The New School’s exhibition at The Bushwick Collective, Otion Front Studio in Brooklyn, The Linda Mary Montano Art Life Institute in Kingston, NY and HiLo in Catskill, NY. Isabelle collaborates with IV Castellano’s Feminist Art Group and has performed at The Judson Memorial Church in NYC as part of The Anarchist Art Festival, with Anarko Art Lab’s Ungovernable Zone at Ft. Tilden, NY, and at Panoply Performance Laboratory and Rosekill Performance Art Farm in Rosendale, NY. Recently, Isabelle participated in Muscular Bonding, a collaborative art research project concieved by Esther Neff involving six artists who traveled, lived and worked together in St. Louis, MO to collectively materialize M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus,) and then performed together at Living Art’s New Genres Festival in Tulsa, OK. Currently a solo exhibition of Isabelle’s work called We Can’t Tell What We’re Doing is on view at HiLo in Catskill, NY from July 20- August 26, 2018. Upcoming, Isabelle will perform at The CX Silver Gallery in Brattleboro, VT and at The Elizabeth Foundation of the Arts in New York City as part of As Far As The Heart Can See / In Honor of Linda Mary Montano, curated by Nicolás Dumit Estevez Raful.

This Little Light of Mine. 2017. Electronic unfired porcelain with spray paint and studio ephemera. 12x12x36″ “This Little Light of Mine is an object built out of sturdy slabs of unfired porcelain that balances the utility, curiosity and fulfillment presented by social systems of religion and power with their potential to remove autonomy and frames the glowing lake of fire within us as the beautiful oneness we experience through cultural bondage.” – Nina Isabelle

“In The Eucharist Machine, information is skewed by a presentation of jumbled non-linear facts and fiction, science, pseudoscience and science fiction. Inaccurate grammar and linguistics push the concept even further by incorporating cockamayme Thai / English subtitles and voice-overs produced by Google Translate and Apple’s Text To Speech system preference in a process that reverse-legitimizes the information. The Eucharist Machine is what happens when the under-informed articulate with high-tech features. Information lost in translation becomes a sort of upcycled spirituality – a futuristic projection of possible renewal of crumbling dialogue between spirituality, commodity, and financial value. The Eucharist Machine takes a serious, culturally backwards, multigenerational look at what it means to be sanctified. This piece was inspired by Chris Lehmann’s book The Money Cult: Capitalism, Christianity and the Unmaking of the American Dream. The Eucharist Machine addresses language, perception, belief, cults, sanctification, and family programming.” – Nina Isabelle